Learn How to Efficiently Use Scrivener with Take Control of Scrivener 3

Tc scrivener3The long-awaited new version of Scrivener (for Mac and iOS) was released a few weeks ago, and we’ve got a newly updated book to match! Take Control of Scrivener 3 by best-selling author Kirk McElhearn walks you through setting up, organizing, writing, formatting, revising, and compiling a Scrivener project, whether you’re working on a Mac or in iOS.

Scrivener is a powerful tool for managing long-form writing projects—such as novels and screenplays—and Take Control of Scrivener 3 gives you all the details you need to know to harness its potential. With Scrivener, you can start writing at any point in your work (end, middle, beginning), then easily move scenes, sections, and chapters until it’s exactly as you want. It also allows you store items such as research material, character sketches, and setting information in the same project file as your writing.

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Analyze Your Writing with Scrivener 3’s Linguistic Focus Tool

Scrivener 3 was recently released, and the app is full of useful improvements. With a refreshed interface, Scrivener 3 also boasts a brand new compile feature (this is the part of the app that exports your projects to various formats). It brings styles, as are common in word processors, making it easier to manage formatting in your projects. Outlining is improved, the Corkboard is enhanced, and statistics are available at a glance. If you currently use Scrivener 2, then it’s a must-have upgrade.

One feature I really like is Linguistic Focus. When you’re writing with Scrivener 3, and get near the end of your project, you may want to scan your work to find certain words you’ve used too much, such as adverbs, or you may want to focus just on the dialog if your work is fiction. Scrivener 3 has a useful new Linguistic Focus tool that can help you zero in on certain types of words and texts.

View a document or your entire project (by selecting your Draft or Manuscript folder), click anywhere in the Editor, then choose Edit > Writing Tools > Linguistic Focus (Control-Command-L). In the panel that appears, select a focus, such as nouns, verbs, or adverbs. Scrivener dims text in the Editor that doesn’t match that focus. (Depending on your Editor’s view, you may need to switch to Scrivenings view to display more than one file. To do this, choose View > Scrivenings, or press Command-1.)

If you select Direct Speech, Scrivener dims all text that is not between quotes, so you can scan dialog more easily.

Linguistic focus

To adjust the dimming of the un-focused text, use the Fade slider at the bottom of the Linguistic Focus panel; if you drag that slider all the way to the right, the un-focused text becomes invisible.

Note that the algorithm for choosing parts of speech is part of macOS and is not perfect, so you may find that certain words are mislabeled when you choose a specific part of speech.

Check out Scrivener 3, and get my book, Take Control of Scrivener 3, to learn how to be productive with this essential writing tool.

Say Hello to Scrivener 3 (and to My Book Take Control of Scrivener 3)

Scrivener3It’s been a long time coming, but it’s finally here. Scrivener 3, the first major update to the go-to text app for writers in seven years, is now available. I’ve been using this for several months, and it’s a solid upgrade to one of the most essential tools for writers.

With a refreshed interface, Scrivener 3 also boasts a brand new compile feature (this is the part of the app that exports your projects to various formats). It brings styles, as are common in word processors, making it easier to manage formatting in your projects. Outlining is improved, the Corkboard is enhanced, and statistics are available at a glance. If you currently use Scrivener 2, then it’s a must-have upgrade.

Tc scrivener3And you’ll probably want some expert guidance when you launch the app. My Take Control of Scrivener 3 ebook is now available so you can make your first steps with the new version of the app with plenty of support. Written with oversight from the Scrivener developers, this is the go-to book for getting the most out of this app.

Learn more about Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Here’s a list of the many new features in Scrivener 3:

  • The interface has been overhauled and modernised.
  • Compile has been redesigned and is now not only much easier to use but also more flexible.
  • The text system now has a full styles system (which is even more powerful when used with the new Compile).
  • View index cards on coloured threads based on label colour (great for tracking different storylines or anything else).
  • Epub 3 and improved Kindle export have been added.
  • Keep track of how much you write each day using Writing Statistics.
  • Improved Custom Metadata allows you to add checkboxes, dates and list boxes to the Inspector and outliner.
  • Enhanced outlining.
  • Corkboard and outliner filtering.
  • Refer to up to four documents in the main window using the new “Copyholders” features.
  • Quickly find any document in your project using the new Quick Search tool.
  • See draft and session progress bars in the toolbar.
  • The powerful new Bookmarks feature replaces Project Notes, References and Favorites, and allows you to view oft-needed documents right in the Inspector.
  • Use “Dialogue Focus” to pick out all the dialogue in your text.
  • Export rich text to MultiMarkdown or Pandoc.
  • Broadened support for technical formats via Markdown output and custom post-processing.
  • Extensive Touch Bar support added.
  • Modernised and rewritten codebase for 64-bit. Scrivener is faster, more stable and ready for the future.

Scrivener 3 costs $45 and is available from the Literature & Latte website. A Mac App Store version will be available soon. Upgrades are available, and a free 30-day download is also available. Scrivener 3 requires macOS 10.12 Sierra or later.

Get Scrivener 3 now, and get Take Control of Scrivener 3.

Collaborate with Apple’s iWork Apps: Pages, Numbers, and Keynote

In a recent article, I looked at options to move away from Microsoft Office when using macOS High Sierra. Microsoft has said that Office 2011 will not be supported by the new Mac operating system, so unless you have a more recent version of Office, or a subscription to Office 365, you’ll be out of luck.

Many people (myself included) use the Office apps occasionally, but not enough to justify a subscription, or to justify buying the latest Mac version. There are other options, one of which is Apple’s iWork apps. These apps have some interesting features for collaborating with others, notably on the web. You can use them in place of Google Docs or other web-based productivity tools, but still work on your Mac and iOS devices as well.

In this article, I want to give you an overview of how you can collaborate using the iWork apps, even with people who don’t have these apps. You’ll see that they can be a good, free solution to replace Microsoft Office or other productivity tools.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 Not Supported on macOS High Sierra

macOS High Sierra is due to be released to the general public today, and it’s a good idea to prepare your Mac before upgrading. While it’s imperative to prepare ahead of time, we also want to highlight the supportability of software that many Mac users depend on: Microsoft Office for Mac.

Do you use Office for Mac 2011? Well, as of macOS 10.13 High Sierra, Microsoft is dropping support for Office 2011. This means that, if you depend on this software, you need to make some changes. You have several options of which we will focus on below.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.