Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 47: Coming Soon from Apple

We discuss the new products that Apple might (or is likely to) announcement next week. We also cover some privacy news about Twitter and Apple’s App Store.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

How to Download all Your Apple Data

You have undoubtedly noticed by now that something called GDPR has just taken effect. The General Data Protection Regulation is a European Union framework for handling user data. Even if you’re not in Europe, you have certainly been receiving emails regarding updated privacy policies. Many companies are applying GDPR’s requirements to their entire customer base under the assumption that it’s better and easier to homogenize the way they manage user data, especially if other countries outside the EU adopt a similar approach to data management in the future. Plus it’s good publicity.

Apple is no exception to this movement. The company has changed the way it handles user data and the way it informs users about privacy. Because of this, it recently unveiled a new option that lets you download most of the data that is linked to your Apple ID.

Read the rest of the article on TidBITS.

This Is Included When Apple Sends You Your Data Dump

Apple has made it possible for users in Europe to request a dump of their data. This includes all sorts of historical information, such as all the repairs and support chats you’ve been involved in, everything you’ve purchased – and even updates you’ve downloaded – from the App Store and iTunes Store, Apple Music activity, and more.

I requested my data a week ago, and nothing stood out; except this. There is a special CSV file for this, and I really don’t know why.

U2 again

You thought you could forget about this…

Instapaper Service Temporarily Suspended in Europe Due to GDPR – Mac Rumors

Popular read-it-later service Instapaper has temporarily suspended user access across Europe as it comes to terms with the EU’s impending General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) laws.

In a message sent to users yesterday – subsequently shared via Twitter courtesy of tech reporter Owen Williams – the bookmarking service said it needs extra time to make necessary changes to comply with GDPR before the deadline on Friday, May 25.

WTF?

Instapaper gave no indication how long the service would be suspended, and offered no further details on why it has waited until now to take action, almost two years after companies were informed of the GDPR timeline.

Two years. Seriously.

Source: Instapaper Service Temporarily Suspended in Europe Due to GDPR – Mac Rumors

How to Easily Remove Old Tweets and Facebook Posts

Your social media accounts are a reflection of your life—at least the part of your digital life that you share with your friends, family members, and perhaps strangers. People post all sorts of things on social media: photos of selfies and vacation pics, links to articles you find interesting, comments about your favorite sports teams, random thoughts about movies, music, politics, and more.

While fun to banter on social media, if you were to take a look back at comments you’ve posted on Facebook and Twitter over the years, you may cringe. There may come a time in your life when you want to clean up what you’ve shared on social media; not that what you’ve posted is necessarily wrong, but this unfiltered content, often composed in the spur of the moment, may not be flattering when taken out of context years later.

In this article, I’ll show you how to use free tools to easily delete old tweets and clean out your Facebook content.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Choose and Answer Security Questions

To help you keep your online accounts safe, most web and cloud services have you answer a number of security questions. You are asked a few things that you know, and that you can remember—such as your first pet’s name, or your mother’s maiden name—so you can access your account and prove your identity, if you forget or lose your password.

Yet sometimes these security questions are too simple, and the answers you provide may be things that people can find out about you far too easily in a web search or on social media. You may tweet a photo of your first dog, and mention that his name was Rex. You may post on Facebook that you met your second grade teacher, Mrs. Harrison. And your mother’s maiden name may be so widely used that anyone who hacks into a large database of user information could find it.

Fortunately, there are ways to get around this. This post explains how to choose the best security questions you should answer, and how to securely answer them so no one can figure them out.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.