Learn How to Create Podcasts with Take Control of Podcasting on the Mac

Tc podcastingStart podcasting or take your podcast to the next level with start-to-finish guidance from Andy Affleck. You’ll learn tricks of the trade as you assemble your hardware and software, make recordings, and add polish by editing and mixing. Once your audio is in the can, you’ll find real-world advice and steps for encoding and publishing your episodes.

The book includes several dozen sound samples from various mics and mixers with and without filters, sleeves, and whatnot, so that you can hear the differences before you buy any special gear.
Take Control of Podcasting on the Mac provides the help anyone interested in podcasting on the Mac needs:

  • What do other podcasters do? Find out about the gear and techniques used by podcasters Chuck Joiner (MacVoices), Louis Trapani (Doctor Who: Podshock), Kelly Guimont (Ask TUAW), and Kirk McElhearn (The Committed).
  • Choose the right mic. Pick out audio gear while considering your budget and studio (or mobile!) needs. Plus, you’ll learn if you should buy additional audio hardware, like a breakout box or mixer, and find an explanation (with photos) of the main cable types that you’ll come across.
  • Pick audio software. Apps discussed at length include GarageBand for Mac and iOS, Audacity, Audio Hijack, Voice Record Pro, and Ecamm Call Recorder. Apps that are discussed briefly include Amadeus Pro, Fission, Sound Studio, Nectar Elements, SoundSoap, and The Levelator, and VocaLive Free.
  • Learn key recording tips. Find advice about how to prepare for and conduct a successful interview, plus get a few essential tips for using a mic well.
  • Record in the studio or the field. Get step-by-step recording directions for GarageBand for Mac and iOS, as well as Audacity, Voice Record Pro, and Audio Hijack.
  • Record online interviews. Follow the book’s steps for recording an interview online through services such as Skype and FaceTime.
  • Edit and mix your audio. Find directions for removing unwanted noises and pauses, adding professional polish, and generally editing and mixing a recording in GarageBand for Mac or Audacity.
  • Encode your podcast files. Before you send your podcast episode out on the Internet, you’ll want to save it in the right format, and add tags.
  • Get syndicated with RSS. Understand what should be in a podcast’s RSS feed — and how FeedBurner can help.
  • Be a publisher! Get ideas for blog services that can host your podcast and related blog posts, and find directions for publishing your podcast in Apple’s iTunes Store.

Get Take Control of Podcasting on the Mac.

The Next Track, Episode #13 – Which Streaming Service Is Right for You?

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk welcome back Chris Connaker to discuss music streaming services. Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal, or another; which is right for you? What are the pros and cons of the various streaming services?

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #13 – Which Streaming Service Is Right for You?.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #12 – iTunes & AppleScript

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk discuss iTunes and AppleScript. This was bound to come sooner or later, since Doug is the AppleScript ninja. We look at what AppleScript does, and discuss more than a dozen of the most useful AppleScripts to use to manage your iTunes library.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #12 – iTunes & AppleScript.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

The Next Track, Episode #11 – Audio Myths and Superstitions

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxDoug and Kirk welcome back Andy Doe, digital music consultant, to discuss myths and superstitions around audio: cables, breaking in hardware, digital audio, and more. But first we discuss classical music playlists on streaming services.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #11 – Audio Myths & Superstitions.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

Microphone Review: The Rode NT-USB Is Great for Podcasting

Rode nt usbI record several podcasts, and co-host two: The Next Track, a podcast about how people listen to music today, and The Committed, a weekly tech podcast about Apple and more. I’ve used a number of microphones over the years for podcasting, but I finally decided that I needed something better. After reading a number of reviews, I settled on the Rode NT-USB. (Amazon.com, Amazon UK)

As you can see from the photo on the left, the Rode NT-USB comes with a desk stand and a pop screen, both useful accessories. While the pop screen is excellent, the desk stand is too low for any serious use; you need to be much closer to the microphone than you can be with this stand to make it sound good. You could use the desk stand for, say, Skype calls, but you don’t need such a good microphone for that use.

Onboard monitoringAs the name suggests, this is a USB microphone. Just plug it into a computer or hub, and choose it in your recording app. The sound is very good, and it’s best if you are very close to the mic. There is a 1/8″ headphone jack on the side of the mic, and two knobs for onboard monitoring. The bottom one is for the headphone volume, and the top one is a monitor mix control; if you want to listen to yourself through headphones, you adjust the balance between your source and your incoming audio.

This is a cardioid mic; here’s the polar response from the manual :

Rode response

In order to be comfortable, I mounted the microphone on a boom. I first bought one that mounted on my desk, but the NT-USB is too heavy. I then bough a standard microphone boom, which is highly adjustable. (I bought this one from Amazon UK; you can find something similar on Amazon.com.) When I record, I place the boom to my right, and the microphone in front of me.

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The Next Track, Episode #10 – Setting Up a Home Media Server

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxHave you ever wanted to set up your own home media server? Doug and Kirk discuss the pros and cons of doing this, and explain how to set up a Mac mini as a media server.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #10 – Setting Up a Home Media Server.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.