The PhotoActive Episode #24 – Manual vs Automatic Camera Settings

Photoactive 400We (good-naturedly) wade back into the question of “What makes a REAL photographer?” In this case, we’re talking about shooting using entirely manual controls or using the auto or semi-automatic modes on your camera. (Spoiler: Anyone with a camera is a real photographer.) We discuss when each approach works, and the advantages of knowing how shutter speed, aperture, and ISO all work together.

Listen to PhotoActive, Episode #24 – Manual vs Automatic Camera Settings.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

The Camera Features on the iPhone XS and XR Bring New Possibilities

People buy new smartphones for many reasons: some for the apps they can run, others for the ability to watch videos and play games, but one feature that drives many to upgrade is the camera. All smartphone makers work hard to improve their cameras to entire users to opt for newer devices, and Apple has done this for years. With this year’s iPhone models – the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR – Apple has brought new possibilities to the camera. (Read our review of the iPhone XS Max here.) But it’s not just the sensors or lenses that change; the real innovation these days is in the software that creates photos called computational photography.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

The PhotoActive Episode #23 – Printing Photos with Rick LePage

Photoactive 400Do you print your photos? Although we know we should make prints, but getting from screen to paper isn’t always easy. It turns out, though, that printing is much easier today than it used to be. In this episode, we welcome photographer and publisher Rick LePage to talk about printing photos at home, from hardware to paper to inks.

Listen to PhotoActive, Episode #23 – Printing Photos with Rick LePage.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

The Next Track, Episode #129 – Discovering Classical Music with Timothy Judd

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxClassical music is vast. How can listeners new to the genre find what they want to listen to, and learn to appreciate the many styles of music it contains. We talk with Timothy Judd who helps listeners do this through his blog.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode 129 – Discovering Classical Music with Timothy Judd.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

Has Apple finally given its super-fast iPhone a camera worthy of the name? – The Guardian

If you’re a keen photographer (which this columnist is) one of the things you prize most is a strange property called bokeh.

No, I don’t think so. A subset of photographers think that background blur is the best thing since sliced bread, but most serious photographers know that it is just one limited effect in their toolkit, one to definitely not overdo.

In the era when all photography was analogue, the only way to get good bokeh was to use lenses that produced narrow depth of field at wide apertures.

In the era when all photography was analogue, no one used the “B” word, which seems to have been adopted around 1997. People did speak of “shallow depth of field,” and this was an effect that was used in portraits and in macro photography, for the most part, but not just to show off the value of a lens, as is often the case now.

The thing about background blur on the iPhone is that it is blur; it looks very different from what you get with a lens and shallow depth of field. It’s nicely done, but it is visibly different from what you get with the optical characteristics of a good lens.

Episode 20 of the PhotoActive podcast discusses background blur in detail.

Source: Has Apple finally given its super-fast iPhone a camera worthy of the name? | The Guardian

The PhotoActive Episode #21 – Editing Photos in iOS Apps

Photoactive 400We’ve talked about using an iPhone as a camera, but what about as a photo editor? The iPhone and iPad have come a long way since the early models, and they’re now quite capable digital darkrooms. But can you do “real” editing on them? Jeff and Kirk reveal how they use their devices with their photos, and cover some of the top editing apps for iOS.

Listen to PhotoActive, Episode #21 – Editing Photos in iOS Apps.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.