macOS Notes App Using a Ridiculous Amount of Memory

I recently started using Apple’s Notes app for taking notes and storing temporary bits of text and URLs. I use Evernote for long-term storage of this sort of thing, but Notes is an easy to use tool for me to jot something down – or dictate it – on my iPhone, and have it available almost instantly on my Mac.

However, I’ve noticed that Notes is using a huge amount of RAM. Here’s what it is currently using on my Mac:

Notes ram
That’s 7.38 GB on a Mac with 16 GB RAM. You can also see that there is 7 GB of swap memory (virtual memory) being used.

This has something to do with networking. If I look in Activity Monitor, there are about 100 processes called Notes Networking, each of which is using between 8 and 9 MB RAM.

Notes networking memory

I have no idea why this is happening; this isn’t just a memory leak, but these are processes being spawned for some reason. And my Mac has not been running long; the last time I restarted it was less than two days ago.

I’m not going to waste my time calling Apple, because their support is broken. Nor will I waste my time filing a bug report.

The only solution is to quit Notes regularly and relaunch it.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 58: New Security Features in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

We take a close look at the great new security features in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave. We also answer a few reader questions, about the Activity Monitor app, about when to upgrade hardware, and whether “free” media sites are safe.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

Understanding New macOS Mojave App Security Alerts

Apple works hard to ensure the security of its operating systems and sometimes these security features can be confusing. In recent years, Apple has sandboxed their operating systems. This means that apps only have access to limited parts of your computer’s operating system and files. The reason for this is to prevent rogue apps from accessing data that they shouldn’t be able to read and to prevent malware from installing in certain parts of the system.

Related to this are specific accessibility permissions for apps that use the accessibility framework and automation permissions, for apps that use AppleScript, and other background technologies. You see dialogs asking you to grant these apps the permission to do certain things to your files.

While sandboxing and permissions are a good thing overall, they can be an annoyance. It means that some apps – notably utilities – are limited as to which files they can access on your Mac, and that some app features that you were used to using on your Mac may no longer work. While some of these permission dialogs existed before Mojave, they have become more common and can be confusing.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

How to Use Annotations and Quick Actions in the macOS Mojave Finder

Among the new features in macOS Mojave is a set of powerful tools in the Finder that lets you manipulate or annotate files. Instead of needing to open an app to make simple changes, you can perform some operations on files directly in a Finder window or using Quick Look. In this article, I’m going to tell you about these new features: Annotations and Quick Actions.

Read the rest of the article – and see the great cat photos – on The Intego Mac Security Blog.

How to Use Dark Mode in macOS Mojave

Dark mode is one of the most visible new features in macOS Mojave, and is the most radical change to the interface of Apple’s operating systems since the advent of Mac OS X in 2001. This setting allows you turn most of what you see into a sort of negative view: instead of black text on a white or gray background, you see gray text on a black (actually, dark gray in most places) background. Windows, menus, toolbars – everything shifts (though there are some elements that don’t change; see below).

Dark mode is not for everyone. Reading white text on a dark background can be difficult for many people, notably those with astigmatism. But some people love working like this; it’s a lot more restrained than the standard interface; there is less light to assail you. It is especially good for working late at night which is probably why many developers tend to favor this mode.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.

How to Convert Automator Workflows to Finder Quick Actions in Mojave

I’ve long used Automator for “quick actions” on files in the Finder. Now, with Mojave’s Quick Actions in the Finder – available when you’re in the new Gallery view – you can run your Automator workflows from this new interface, instead of using a contextual menu, or other method.

To do this, open a workflow, then choose File > Convert To… By default, Automator displays its file type dialog with Quick Action selected.

Convert quick action

Click Choose, then press Command-S to save the file and name it. It will immediately appear in the Finder’s Quick Action More menu.

If you want it to be visible in the Quick Action sidebar, go to System Preferences > Extensions, then Finder. You’ll see a list of available quick actions. The first two items in the list show up in the Finder. Drag any quick actions you want to be visible to the top of the list. And you can uncheck any that you don’t use, so they don’t clutter up the More menu.

Extensions

Unfortunately, I don’t yet see any way to show more than two quick actions in the Finder, before the More menu, so choose the ones that are really most useful to you.

Finder qa