Indexes, writing about – Illuminations

Most of my waking hours are currently occupied in compiling the index to my book Screening the Royal Shakespeare Company: A Critical History. Not sure if I’ve mentioned this before, but this is to be published by Bloomsbury in The Arden Shakespeare series in June. Instead of writing this blog post I should be compiling my index. Instead of eating – and indeed, probably, sleeping, I should be compiling my index. But, well, compiling an index is a process that is both fascinating and deeply, deeply dull, and the occasional distraction has to be a good thing. I asked colleagues whether I should compile the index, or whether I should pay a professional to do it.

Most professionals (see below) advise against an author doing it themselves. But that’s what I opted to do – and I’m not regretting that call. Really I’m not. Along with all else, the process has made me curious about the creation of indexes.

Indexes are cool. Lots of great links here.

Source: Indexes, writing about – Illuminations

The Virtue of Using Analog Tools for Business

You’re reading this article on a smartphone, tablet, or computer; and, I wrote it on a computer, and then edited it on my iPad. These digital tools are the mainstays of our modern world, and they streamline many of our tasks, making it possible to create and distribute content quickly and easily.

But there’s another way to work, one that is gaining in popularity: using analog tools for business. More and more people are using pens and pencils, pads and notebooks to create; they’re using sticky notes to jot down ideas; they’re using film cameras, watches with moving hands, and they’re reading print books.

While we’ve gotten used to the digital way of working, analog puts us in a different mindset, one that’s slower, more reflective, and that frees us from the tyranny of screens. Here’s why you should use analog tools (at least occasionally).

Read the rest of the article on The Startup Finance Blog.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 72: Marzipan, and the iOSification of macOS

After some news about Facebook and user data (again), and a look at Apple’s plan for securely managing health records, we look at Marzipan, Apple’s framework for allowing iOS apps to easily run on macOS. What will the future look like? Will macOS become similar to iOS? And will we see touch-screen Macs in the future?

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The PhotoActive Podcast, Episode 37: Backups and 360-Degree Photos

Photoactive 400We’re tackling two topics in this episode. First up, all-important backups! We emphasize backups all the time, but what does a good backup system look like? Then, after the break, we turn a never-ending corner and look at 360-degree photography, an interesting and creative niche.

Listen to PhotoActive, Episode 37: Backups and 360-Degree Photos.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at the PhotoActive website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @PhotoActiveCast to keep up to date with new episodes, and join our Facebook group to chat with other listeners and participate in photo challenges and more.

Learn How to Use Siri in the New Book Take Control of Siri

Tc siriWhen Take Control Books ran a customer survey last summer, asking which Apple software products people would most like to read about, Siri got the most votes. In keeping with their theme of giving you what you’ve asked for, they are delighted to announce our latest book, Take Control of Siri by former Macworld editor Scholle McFarland! This book is the definitive guide to Apple’s voice-controlled digital assistant across all platforms—iOS, Mac, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and even HomePod. If you own any Apple device with Siri support, this book will tell you everything you need to know about being more productive, saving time and effort, and having fun with Siri. And you may be surprised at how powerful Siri has become since its early days!

This book is a terrific resource. Here’s just a tiny sampling of what’s in this 138-page book:

  • The numerous ways to activate Siri (by touch or by voice)
  • How to personalize Siri by telling it about yourself, your contacts, and more
  • How to use Siri with AirPods, wired earbuds, or third-party headphones—or in your car
  • How to ask Siri about sports, math and conversions, time, food, movies, people, stocks, the weather, jokes, and random facts (including follow-up questions)
  • How to control music (on any device, with or without an Apple Music subscription)
  • Techniques for using Siri to get directions, set reminders and appointments, send messages and email, and take notes
  • Ways to use Siri to search for files on your Mac
  • What Siri can and can’t do for you on an Apple TV or HomePod
  • How to make and use Siri Shortcuts on an iOS device or Apple Watch
  • Everything you need to know about your privacy where Siri is involved

In addition, Scholle has made a series of videos to go with the book, showing you exactly what happens as you use Siri. (Two are ready right now, and eight more will be available in the coming days.) You’ll get to see and hear how to make the most of Siri (as well as its sense of humor).

Get Take Control of Siri now.

Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 71: How to Securely Dispose of Hard Drives

A Messages prank, Google getting caught with a hidden mic, and password managers have flaws. And we discuss destroying hard drives creatively.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.