Classical musicians to break with tradition and speak to the audience – Daily Telegraph

In the hope of breaking down century old barriers between an orchestra and its audience the performers will step up to the front to talk about the piece they are about to play, its history, how the rehearsal process has impacted on the finished piece and what it means to them. The orchestra’s conductors will also introduce themselves and the music.

The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, led by Marin Alsop, is going to make their concerts less stodgy, but why has this taken so long? I’ve attended concerts where there was a talk about the music before the concert, but as a separate “event,” usually an hour before. These are generally sparsely attended. It makes sense to have a brief intro for the different works performed, as long as it isn’t too didactic.

Source: Classical musicians to break with tradition and speak to the audience

New Security Features in macOS Mojave

macOS Mojave doesn’t have a lot of visible new features, aside from the new dark mode, but under the hood there are plenty of changes to make the operating system faster, more stable, and more secure. In this article, I’m going to discuss some of the new security features that make Mojave easier to use safer and securely.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

The Album is in Trouble, and the Music Business Probably Can’t Save it – Rolling Stone

How can something (streaming) be considered the “equivalent” of something else (an album sale) when, by your own measure, the former now completely dominates the latter?

In 2018, “streaming-equivalent albums” seems like daft phrasing. It is e-mail-equivalent faxes. It is car-equivalent steeds. It is Netflix-equivalent Betamax.

We all know that the album is dying. But the album is a fairly recent construct. As Doug and I discussed in the very first episode of The Next Track podcast, we move from the single as the main element of music sales to the album, and we’re just moving back to the single again. The music industry will adapt.

Source: The Album is in Trouble, and the Music Business Probably Can’t Save it – Rolling Stone

Apple pumps up its Amazon listings with iPhones, iPads and more – CNET

Amazon has signed a deal to expand the selection of Apple products on its sites worldwide.

The world’s largest e-commerce company said Friday it’ll soon start selling more Apple products directly and have access to Apple’s latest devices, including the new iPad Pro, iPhone XR, iPhone XS, and Apple Watch Series 4, as well as Apple’s lineup of Beats headphones. The Amazon-Apple deal encompasses the US, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan and India, with the new products hitting Amazon sites in the coming weeks.

Only Apple-authorized resellers will now be allowed to sell Apple and Beats products on Amazon’s marketplace.

Currently, many of these Apple products are either unavailable on Amazon or are on sale only through its third-party marketplace at varied prices and conditions. Amazon does already directly sell some Apple devices, such as MacBook laptops and Beats headphones.

This is a good thing. Amazon is full of spurious listings for Apple products. I recently wanted to buy my son AirPods; he’s in Paris, and I’m in the UK, and, since they were cheaper on Amazon.fr, I wanted to buy them there rather than from Apple. I sifted through a dozen listings, from all sorts of third-party sellers, before I could find one that was sold and shipped by Amazon. Many of the reviews for the AirPods spoke of counterfeits, and the only way to be certain was to get them from Amazon.

I hope, however, that Amazon doesn’t prevent people from selling Apple products used. I’ve sold a couple of iPods, and a first-gen Apple pencil on Amazon, and it’s practical to be able to sell there, as it’s often less of a hassle than with eBay.

Source: Apple pumps up its Amazon listings with iPhones, iPads and more – CNET

The 4 Best Productivity Apps to Organize Your Information

Whether you’re setting up a new business or running an existing company, you have lots of information to manage and store. Much of this lives in apps such as your accounting app, CRM tool, or a database. But there’s a lot of disparate information that you and your team need to make your business run smoothly. In this article, we’re going to look at some of the best productivity apps that you can use to store and organize information, and especially to share it with the rest of your team.

You probably already use some sort of cloud storage service to share files: you may use Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud, or Microsoft One Drive to keep your business documents available to your team 24/7. But these document repositories aren’t the most efficient way to store disparate bits of information, such as clippings from interesting articles, links to websites you want to check out and share, or information such as to-do lists or notes. Most of these platforms do offer apps for this purpose, and we’ll look at these tools.

You have two options when choosing a tool for organizing information: you can use the app provided by the platform your team uses for its documents, or you can use something else. If all your team uses the Apple ecosystem, then Apple’s Notes app might work for you. If you work on Office 365, Microsoft OneNote will help you interface easily with your files. And if you’re a Google-based company, Google Keep might be what you need. However, these apps are not all created equally; not all of them are powerful enough for business needs.

Read the rest of the article on The Startup Finance Blog.

New Security and Privacy Features in iOS 12

iOS 12 has brought many new features to your iPhone and iPad as we discussed here. But beyond the more obvious changes – new notifications, Screen Time, Shortcuts and others – iOS 12 has delivered a bushel of new security features. Most of these features revolve around passwords and iCloud Keychain, but there are a few other features that make your devices more secure. Here’s an overview of what’s new in iOS 12 security.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.