Intego Mac Podcast, Episode 31: Delete Your Social Media History

We discuss the new EFAIL issue affecting encrypted email; discuss a new class-action suit against Apple; and then explain how you can delete your history on Facebook and Twitter. It’s not easy, but it’s possible.

Check out the latest episode of The Intego Mac Podcast, which I co-host with Josh Long. We talk about Macs and iOS devices, and how to keep them secure.

The Next Track, Episode #105 – The Future of Vinyl

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxAndy Doe joins us to discuss the present and future of vinyl records.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #105 – The Future of Vinyl.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

Use AirDrop to Securely Transfer Files Across Your Devices

There are many ways to transfer files from one Mac to another, and a few ways to transfer files to and from iOS devices. The easiest and most practical way to do this is to use AirDrop, a feature built into iOS, since version 7, and macOS, since Lion (Mac OS X 10.7). Macs and iOS devices built since 2012 support AirDrop.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to use AirDrop to quickly and securely transfer files across your devices. I’ll also teach you how to configure AirDrop so you don’t get potentially malicious files from people you don’t know.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

Speaker Cables: Can You Hear the Difference? – Sound & Vision

In the early 1980s, esoteric high-end audio as we know it today was just taking off as an alternative to the mass-market equipment offered in neighborhood TV/appliance stores. Fueled by an underground audio press that included magazines and newsletters such as Sound & Vision sister publication Stereophile, The Absolute Sound, International Audio Review, The Audio Critic, and others, a cottage industry emerged, one populated by small manufacturers of low-volume, high-priced exotica claiming greater faithfulness to the music than the gear reviewed and advertised in the pages of Stereo Review, High Fidelity, Audio, et al. Some of these claims were founded—true advances were indeed being made by start-ups run by technicians with first-class bonafides and good ears. But the High End also attracted its share of half-baked products and at least a few charlatans looking to cash in selling accessories that had little higher performance than a dime-store engagement ring.

In the midst of all this, the premium cable business emerged, driven in no small part by the success of the early Monster Cable products that followed the company’s founding by engineer/audiophile Noel Lee in 1979. The editors of our precursor Stereo Review were suspicious of the benefits of such speaker cables and interconnects, which were suddenly being proffered by an ever-widening mix of high-end specialists, often at prices far higher than Monster’s. The highly objective measurement-based testing approach employed by Julian Hirsch and his colleagues already ran counter to the high-end community’s subjective reviews, which focused solely on claimed sonic differences that SR’s instruments couldn’t detect. It wasn’t long before Stereo Review began positioning itself as the skeptical voice of reason in what its editors deemed an audio industry gone mad.

It was no surprise, then, that in 1983, the magazine jumped at the opportunity to conduct a double-blind listening test, which editor-in-chief Bill Livingston and his colleagues hoped would reveal, scientifically, that high-end cables were indeed a hoax and provided no higher performance than the everyday lamp cord in common use at the time.

Interesting reprint of a 1983 article examining speaker cables to see if listeners could tell the difference between average cables and premium wires.

Source: Speaker Cables: Can You Hear the Difference? | Sound & Vision

How to Easily Remove Old Tweets and Facebook Posts

Your social media accounts are a reflection of your life—at least the part of your digital life that you share with your friends, family members, and perhaps strangers. People post all sorts of things on social media: photos of selfies and vacation pics, links to articles you find interesting, comments about your favorite sports teams, random thoughts about movies, music, politics, and more.

While fun to banter on social media, if you were to take a look back at comments you’ve posted on Facebook and Twitter over the years, you may cringe. There may come a time in your life when you want to clean up what you’ve shared on social media; not that what you’ve posted is necessarily wrong, but this unfiltered content, often composed in the spur of the moment, may not be flattering when taken out of context years later.

In this article, I’ll show you how to use free tools to easily delete old tweets and clean out your Facebook content.

Read the rest of the article on The Mac Security Blog.