Apple Silently Updates AirPods Firmware to 3.5.1 – TidBITS

Apple has silently updated the AirPods firmware from version 3.3.1 to 3.5.1.

Read the article to see how to check that your AirPods’ firmware is updated. You won’t notice anything; it’s probably a very small amount of data. But if you want to be sure that you’re up to date, you can check.

Oh, and that version number? Usually we’d be at 1.x.x; it’s surprising that it’s already up to version 3.

Source: Apple Silently Updates AirPods Firmware to 3.5.1 – TidBITS

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The Committed Podcast Looks at AirPods, Thinness, and the King of Sweden

The Committed Podcast Icon 1400x1400 01We chat about Apple’s decreased software quality and our hopes for the future, including re-prioritizing things like thinness (a word Kirk hates) over battery life. Then Alexa and the King of Sweden completely derail us.

Listen to The Committed, Episode 156: “Gimme Some Thickness”

If you like The Committed podcast, you can subscribe or leave a rating or review on iTunes, or with your favorite podcatcher.

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The Limitations of Find My AirPods

One of the features of the upcoming iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods. This is just an addition to the Find My iPhone app, which can find any of your network-connected Apple products: iPhones, iPads, Macs, and Apple Watches.

I’ve installed iOS 10.3 on my iPod touch to test it, and it’s clear that there are some limitations with Find My AirPods.

It won’t find your AirPods if they’re in their case. And it won’t find them if they’re out of charge. It will only find them if they’re paired with the device you’re using to search for them. Which also means it will only find them if you’re within range of where they’re located.

Find my airpods

On the plus side, when you are within range, you can have them play a sound, but when I tested this with them in their case, the sound was “pending,” as you can see above, and never played even after I eventually paired them with my iPod. But this is a beta, so it’s understandable that certain features don’t work correctly.

The biggest problem is that, unlike with iPhones, iPads, and Macs, the AirPods need to be paired to a device to work. If you’ve lost them in their case, you’re out of luck.

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Apple Investigating Issue With AirPods Randomly Disconnecting During Calls – Mac Rumors

Apple is investigating multiple reports from iPhone owners of AirPods randomly disconnecting and reconnecting during calls, MacRumors has learned.

A long thread on Apple’s Support Communities website has been generated by AirPods users who are regularly experiencing Bluetooth connection dropouts during phone calls, despite the fact that the wireless earphones almost never lose their connection when used to listen to music or anything else.

I’ve not seen this with my iPhone SE, but I have had a large number of calls simply drop when I’m using the AirPods. I can’t be sure it has anything to do with them, but before I had the AirPods, when using a wired headset, I rarely had calls drop.

Source: Apple Investigating Issue With AirPods Randomly Disconnecting During Calls – Mac Rumors

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Apple AirPods and Battery Life

Since I got my AirPods on Monday, I’ve been using them to listen to podcasts and audiobooks about two hours a day. From Monday through Thursday, that’d make about eight hours of battery time.

Right after I got the AirPods, I plugged the case in to charge it completely. I think it was around 93% when I first checked, so it quickly charged to capacity. Since then, I did not re-charge the case, letting it change the AirPods, and letting the case’s battery run out.

So that gives me about eight hours’ battery life; Apple rates them at about 24 hours listening time, and 11 hours talk time.

AirPods with Charging Case: More than 24 hours listening time, up to 11 hours talk time.

I did use them for a few phone calls; lets say an hour and a half, so 14% of the total rated battery time. Add that to eight hours of listening, and it’s well under Apple’s specs.

Last night, the case was at 0%, and the AirPods were around 50%. When I checked this morning, the AirPods were dead. I suspect the AirPods may be constantly polling for a device to connect to. Since they only automatically connect to my iPhone – and only when not in the case – they wouldn’t have found it overnight, since I left the AirPods in my office, and my iPhone was in the bedroom. But since the case’s battery was dead, perhaps the AirPods thought they were not in the case and were looking for a connection all night until they ran out of power.

No matter what, this battery life is quite poor. I’ll do some more testing, but if I were to use these more intensively, I’d be disappointed by the amount of time they last. Right now, I’m recharging to 100%, and I’ll try to note in detail how long I use them.

To be fair, it only took less than 10 minutes to charge the AirPods to more than 20%, so I could use them for a walk. So even if you wake up and they’re dead, you can charge them pretty quickly.

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