The Next Track, Episode #66 – Minimalist Pianist R. Andrew Lee

The Next Track Blue Flat Button2 400pxPianist R. Andrew Lee joins us to discuss the minimal, and often very long, works of music he performs and records.

Listen to The Next Track: Episode #66 – Minimalist Pianist R. Andrew Lee.

Find out more, and subscribe to the podcast, at The Next Track website. You can follow The Next Track on Twitter at @NextTrackCast, to keep up to date with new episodes, and new articles from the website.

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iA Writer 5: From Raw to Cooked to Sushi – iA

“Technology evolves from raw, to complex, to simple. From the fist, to the hand axe, to the hammer. From carts, to the Model T, to self-driving cars. From switchboard-operated phones to digital phones to smartphones. From SMS to Facebook to Messenger. From the crude to the cooked to Sushi. After seven years of development, where on this trajectory is iA Writer?”

iA Writer is my text editor of choice on the Mac. I use it for most of my writing. (I also use Scrivener, MarsEdit, and Nisus Writer Pro, which are each used for specific types of projects.) They’ve gone from simple to complex back to simple, and it remains the easiest text editor for writing (i.e., not for working with code), and one of the most attractive to use.

In this article, the people at Information Architects discuss their design philosophy, and how important it is to keep things simple. There’s a constant give and take between simplicity and features that users want, but Information Architects has managed to keep their app one of the clearest, easiest to use text editors for Mac.

Source: iA Writer 5: From Raw to Cooked to Sushi – iA

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Color Calibrating Your Mac’s Display

If you only use your Mac for browsing the Web, sending and receiving email, and working in a word processor, it’s probably not all that important for it to have accurate colors. Contrarily, if you work with photos or videos, or even if you like to watch movies in the best possible conditions, calibrating your display is essential.

The calibration process tweaks a number of settings to get the colors and contrast on your Mac as accurate as possible. It does this by changing the intensity of the main colors — red, blue, and green — and setting the white point, or the neutral white color that you see when, say, you open a new document in a word processor.

It’s easy to color calibrate your Mac’s display. Here’s how you can do it.

Read the rest of the article on the Mac Security Blog.

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